Intel driver version 10.18.3910 running on an i7 363QM (HD4000), OpenGL 4.0 supported.

This code:

Code :
    uint a = 0xFFFFFFFF;
    uint b = -1;
 
    if(a != b) {
        return vec3(0,0,1);
    }
    else {
        return vec3(1,0,0);
    }

actually returns vec3(0,0,1). My world has been shattered.

In all seriousness, this seems like a nasty bug on a basic functionality. I checked the GLSL4.0 spec to make sure this made sense and it does explain all int and uints are 32 bits, with ints being two's complemente ( https://www.opengl.org/registry/doc/...pec.4.00.7.pdf ), so this inequality should never happen.

One would think the problem lies on the -1, but it seems to actually be on the 0x value. Passing a uniform uint with value 0xFFFFFFFF fails the equality check against the 0x constant while succeeds against the -1.

EDIT:

Yeah, this is broken.

Code :
    uint a = 0xFFFFFFFF;
    uint b = 0xFFFFFFFE;
    b += 1;
 
    if(a != b) {
        return vec3(0,0,1);
    }
    else {
        return vec3(1,0,0);
    }

Returns vec3(0,0,1);

I suppose this is some kind of informal bug report, but I'm pretty sure Intel reads these forums as much as they update their GL drivers.