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View Full Version : The most novice of CS majors you've ever had. NEED HELP!!!!!



smokums
01-01-2017, 10:15 PM
Im extremely new to the realm of computer science and coding. Im currently studying for my undergrad degree in CS. Im familiar with C++ and different data structures, im also familiar with some processes of software engineering, specifically, OOD(making classes, functions, ect... abstract data types/templates and all that jazz. Also have taken up to discrete math. ) I digress, but im having some problems in my personal learning process. I've wanted to learn about rendering and graphics, and am very vaguely familiar with this like simple direct media layer 2. I have been using codeblocks as an IDE for a little while now and have started using MVS recently during school, but im very unfamiliar with how the compiler directly works, or how anything with assembly works. Im wanting to learn more about graphics and computers in general, but again I digress. The point of my post is to start messing around and working with openGL. I have purchased the openGL super bible 7th edition. Im needing some help in getting started. I dont know exactly all of the methods of getting the libraries installed on my machine, and linking them to my IDE. PLEASE TEACH ME LIKE IM PURE NOOB, PEANUT GALLERY, I've read through all of the tutorial on github on how to install the libraries, but Im having issues with the current set up, because I am personally unfamiliar with DOS and Cmake completely, I have no idea how these programs work or what they do. I do have a small SMALL bit of experience with Make because I have taken a UNIX systems class in school and I understand that make is a method thats built into unix that will allow you to compile small segments of code that are parts of larger projects so that you dont have to re compile the entire project because because unix uses the most up to date timestamp on its compilations... , but that is about all I know about it. ANYWAYS, I could use help setting up the libraries for openGL on a Windows 10 64 bit machine, so that I can complete the initial tutorial of the openGL superbible. I cant get past chapter 2.....

Dark Photon
01-02-2017, 08:47 AM
Im extremely new to the realm of computer science and coding. Im currently studying for my undergrad degree in CS.

Cool -- welcome!


...The point of my post is to start messing around and working with openGL. I have purchased the openGL super bible 7th edition.

Im needing some help in getting started. I dont know exactly all of the methods of getting the libraries installed on my machine, and linking them to my IDE. ...

I could use help setting up the libraries for openGL on a Windows 10 64 bit machine, so that I can complete the initial tutorial of the openGL superbible.

Ok, first step: Does your GPU and its installed drivers support OpenGL 4.5? If I recall correctly, that is one of the requirements for that edition of The OpenGL Superbible (https://www.amazon.com/OpenGL-Superbible-Comprehensive-Tutorial-Reference/dp/0672337479/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1483373525&sr=8-1&keywords=opengl+superbible).

One easy way to check is to install an app like GPU Caps Viewer (http://www.ozone3d.net/gpu_caps_viewer/), and it'll tell you what version of OpenGL that your GPU + GPU driver support.

Also, read the file HOWTOBUILD.txt file at the top of the Superbible Examples source tree. If you have specific questions, just ask.


I am personally unfamiliar with ... Cmake completely, ... I do have a small SMALL bit of experience with Make ...

Make is a general tool which executes rules you write that turn source files into derived object files (e.g. object files and executables). It's commonly used on UNIX/Linux-like operating systems to build programs and systems, but can be used on Windows as well.

The project and solution files in Microsoft Visual Studio (MSVS) serve the same purpose, but like everything Microsoft is only available with their tool on their OS. So they're basically useless for cross-platform development.

So what if you want to develop cross-platform tools and libraries that can be compiled with either of these methods? That's where CMake comes in. It layers on top of both of these, providing an abstract interface to define build rules. It can then publish these rules into the specific build files needed on a particular platform, freeing you from needing to maintain multiple copies of your build rules in platform-specific formats.

As a Windows user of a package (OpenGL Superbible Examples) built using CMake, you just tell CMake to generate MSVS build files for that project, and then you take those produced build files and build the package (e.g. using MSVS or CMake itself). Of course, before you can do so, you'll need to download and install CMake first:

* https://cmake.org/download/

and add it to your $PATH.