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View Full Version : How long does it take to become an OpenGL master? Any masters out there?



John Jenkins
10-24-2002, 01:59 PM
Well I get better and better each day. Eventually I am going to be able to use all of the OpenGL capabilities and do it well. My question is what is the next step? How can I go from good programmer to excellent game programmer? I don't understand the industry very well. Are there schools that you guys recommend? I figure about another year and I will know the red book really well and be really good at OpenGL. If I wanted to go a step higher what should I do? What do OpenGL masters do? Mostly game programmers I suspect. I am getting to a point where I would like to do a side project and submit it to a web site for everyone to see. Anyone know of a website that accepts submissions? I am leaning towards making a game since I love games.

john
10-24-2002, 04:30 PM
Vader... you must confront Vader... only then, a Master you will be.

dorbie
10-24-2002, 05:49 PM
OpenGL is always expanding, recently at an incredible rate. You have to keep mastering the new stuff just to keep up. Then there's the application areas and algorithms, some of which are highly specialized and they also change and grow. If you ever think you've mastered everything you're probably wrong and even if you're right time will make you wrong.

dorbie
10-24-2002, 05:53 PM
P.S. for the latest stuff go to the source, that means mainly NVIDIA & ATI web sites and specs on OpenGL.org, some of the specs on OpenGL.org can be a bit dry and inpenetrable, especially if you're not familiar with all the related concepts, that's where the developer relations stuff from NVIDIA and ATI helps a lot.

CybeRUS
10-24-2002, 07:49 PM
Use google, Luke!
and may GeForce be with you!

JONSKI
10-26-2002, 02:14 PM
My Mantis-style OpenGL has no equal.

knackered
10-26-2002, 04:13 PM
Mastering opengl should not be your main concern if you want to write games. Make sure you've got mechanisms in place for things like basic triangle rendering (start with primitive shapes, like spheres/cylinders/boxes), an object property mechanism (so you can change properties at runtime to aid debugging new features), collision detection, route finding, camera control, some kind of high-level language for describing behaviours. Make sure you have a fast, clear and consistent maths library. Make sure you use a scenegraph structure for your graphics - any other type of scene representation should merely be a specialised node stemming off the scenegraph (bspnode, octreenode etc.). This will give you the most flexibility.
Per-pixel lighting etc. should really be the icing on your cake, not the sponge. The last thing you should do, rather than the first.
Once you have these mechanisms in place, you should find that the more advanced graphics techniques should be easier to 'drop-in' to your structure.
When you do get to the advanced graphics stage, make sure you use a shader scripting language (an existing one, such as rendermonkey's xml files, or one of your own making).

Hazem_vb
10-26-2002, 06:47 PM
Tip

You have not to master OpenGL to write

powerful games .

About the mastering time

It depends on you .

If you implement every thing you learn

(Recommened) you will take and all your life

become OpenGL Maximum at 3 Years (My

Opinion) .

else

if you learn OpenGl and donot implement what

you learn i think it is useless to learn it .

Hope you good and the best in your life .

Hazem_vb

Hazem_vb
10-26-2002, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by Hazem_vb:
Tip

You have not to master OpenGL to write

powerful games .

About the mastering time

It depends on you .

If you implement every thing you learn

(Recommened) you will take ,And All your life

become OpenGL , Maximum at 3 Years (My

Opinion) .

else

if you learn OpenGl and donot implement what

you learn i think it is useless to learn it .

Hope you good and the best in your life .

Hazem_vb

jwatte
10-26-2002, 06:54 PM
What I've found so far (and, no, I wouldn't consider myself mater of all of these :-)


Learn how to learn.

Then learn how to debug.

Then learn how to build, by studying many many examples, good and bad, and building on your own. Don't matter much if it's databases or the Linux kernel or Quake.

Then learn how to be listening and considerate in a team of very mixed people.

Then work at it for another ten years, all the while keeping up with development.


I suppose a good college education is a good base. I'd go for Math if I could go back, I think, or possibly EE. CS isn't actually the most solid foundation, as most of it is evolving so quickly that you're probably better off just doing reading on the side.

Hazem_vb
10-26-2002, 06:58 PM
Originally posted by Hazem_vb:


I Forget to tell you that is an excellent

site in Game Programming
http://www.GameTutorials.com

Bye

Hazem_vb

An OpenGL Game Programmer

V-man
10-26-2002, 09:38 PM
All of the above +

if one day you come up with some original idea and end up impressing all the CG society with your paper and your working demo, you can consider yourself a master.

It's kind of like the chemists and physicist who do research and after a few years, they discover something big.

V-man