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RaquelSp
03-07-2005, 06:59 AM
Hi,

I am a beginner in Opengl, and i'm having some problems with the stereo and fullscreen mode.
I have a GeForce FX 5700 LE with a chipset of nvidia, and i have installed the stereo software.
The stereo test of nvidia is passed by the card.

My problems start when i try to run an application in which i want to allow the fullscreen or the gamemode to see it in stereo with my card. In this moment i always get a memory access error.

I've tried too to run a stero application with the STEREO mode in opengl, but this card doesn't allow this mode.

Could anybody help me telling to me how to develop an stereo application with opengl to run with this card??????

SOS Thank you in advance

Mikkel Gjoel
03-07-2005, 03:54 PM
quad-buffer stereo, which is probably what you're looking for, is only available in the Quadro-line of Nvidia-cards.

Some of the "regular" geforce-cards are shipped with shutterglasses for stereo-viewing, but this is entirely a driver-feature. You cannot control the individual images for each eye (instead the driver assumes units are in meters (iirc) and creates the eye-separation accordingly).

You could of course do some hyperfancy trickery to force control over the left/right-image rendering, but I really don't think it's worth it :)

\\hornet

def
03-08-2005, 12:27 AM
This "driver-feature" is meant for apps which do not support stereo viewing natively.
In your own OpenGL Application you are free to implement two cameras (left/right eye) and switch between them from frame to frame. Vsync needs to be turned on in the driver and you need shutter-glasses which will sync to the VGA frequency.
This would be the way to get (shuttered) stereo view from your GeForce FX 5700 LE.
I hope this is waht you were looking for.

Mikkel Gjoel
03-08-2005, 09:47 AM
Nice, I didn't know you could do that. Not exactly "hyperfancy trickery" :)

Overmind
03-08-2005, 02:17 PM
It's not that easy. You have to make sure you never miss a frame. If you miss one, you have to make sure you miss the next one, too, because otherwise the left and right eye are swapped...

def
03-09-2005, 04:02 AM
Originally posted by Overmind:
It's not that easy. You have to make sure you never miss a frame. If you miss one, you have to make sure you miss the next one, too, because otherwise the left and right eye are swapped...Well, I would consider that "easy" to do, just keep a close eye on your FPS. The real drawback is the framerate. To get decent quality without too much flickering the vSync rate of the monitor has to be pretty high, which limits you to the amount of complexity you can display without loosing a frame.

vincoof
03-10-2005, 12:06 AM
It's not that easy. You know you're missing a frame only when you missed it, that is when it's too late. Not to mention the difficulty to detect such loss.
The point being, only a component very close to the display can handle it correctly. For that matter, the graphics hardware is your best bet, or the driver sometimes can do it. But I doubt a software can do it with good results unless it gets extermely close to the display, which is by far out of the scope of the OpenGL API.