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Thread: Text Editor with OpenGL Support

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  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie
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    Question Text Editor with OpenGL Support

    Good day!

    I'm a beginner to OpenGL to say the least, and need a little bit of a nudge in the right direction in terms of development environments. I develop in ANSI C strictly, I don't want any C++ nonsense :P

    At the moment I'm using the Sublime2 Text Editor, yet it's getting to the stage where I'm looking for something a bit more feature rich with more direct OpenGL support (highlighting etc), that doesn't shove a massive IDE in my face. I love the elegance of using a basic text editor, and have previously heard big names such as Vim and Emacs thrown about, yet not in the context of OpenGL.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance,
    Kappers!

  2. #2
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    On its way - but not ready for prime time atm. Meanwhile, text editors are probably all you've got to hold you over. You can also check out http://sourceforge.net/projects/lumina/files/. You may also find RenderMonkey quite satisfactory but it's discontinued and not GL3+ ready - at least as far as I remember.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by thokra View Post
    On its way - but not ready for prime time atm. Meanwhile, text editors are probably all you've got to hold you over. You can also check out http://sourceforge.net/projects/lumina/files/. You may also find RenderMonkey quite satisfactory but it's discontinued and not GL3+ ready - at least as far as I remember.
    Hmmm I think I may leave RenderMonkey if its discontinued, doesn't seem like a wise move, even if it's still performing well. I'm really keen to check out Lumina, but I keep getting packet errors on the website! Dang, I'll have to give it a bit of time. Cheers!

  4. #4
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    What do You mean by 'highlighting'? GLSL syntax highlighting, or highlighting funtion names and parameters, GL constants, etc?

    I used both vim (gvim) and emacs, both of them have GLSL syntax highlighting scripts (built-in or available for download,
    I never remember, just setup them once and forget about their existence),
    You can code your own scripts, it's fairly simple. In fact You can code pretty much anything INSIDE emacs (elisp).

    Now I'm sticking with gvim (for me it's faster and simpler, but that is my personal preference).
    Beware! Both editors can be hard at the begining, but once You are spoiled by vim/emacs You will have hard time using any IDE .
    For me good text editor with built in interpreted language and vcs support beats any IDE ever invented.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kowal View Post
    What do You mean by 'highlighting'? GLSL syntax highlighting, or highlighting funtion names and parameters, GL constants, etc?

    I used both vim (gvim) and emacs, both of them have GLSL syntax highlighting scripts (built-in or available for download,
    I never remember, just setup them once and forget about their existence),
    You can code your own scripts, it's fairly simple. In fact You can code pretty much anything INSIDE emacs (elisp).

    Now I'm sticking with gvim (for me it's faster and simpler, but that is my personal preference).
    Beware! Both editors can be hard at the begining, but once You are spoiled by vim/emacs You will have hard time using any IDE .
    For me good text editor with built in interpreted language and vcs support beats any IDE ever invented.
    Yep just function names and parameters etc, I'm pretty sure a beginner like me wouldn't be jumping straight into GLSL Sublime2 did have highlighting, but it wasn't doing it for me.

    Ah well it's nice to still hear such strong support for those two, I'll have to check them out. They sure do seem hard to use, emacs looks like it has it's own bloody language to learn..... But if it's worth it as you say, I may as well give it a go.

    Cheers

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