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Thread: Future of OpenGL (where does it belong to?)

  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie
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    Mar 2000
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    Paderborn
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    Future of OpenGL (where does it belong to?)

    Greetings!

    Does OpenGL belong to Microsoft, yet?
    I've heart that MS takes over OpenGL and
    now host a hugh amount of OpenGL.
    If this is true, than how much influences
    will MS take on OpenGL over the next years?
    And what will SGI do for the future of
    OpenGL?

    I've heart about a jointventure with
    nvidia & SGI. Does they plan a new graphic
    language with new technologies?

    I think, if the above assumtions are true,
    than OpenGL goes over to MS (win) and
    they will change the style of OpenGL the
    way that it only runs "without" problems on
    windows.

    Any suggestions?

    cu,
    Robert

  2. #2
    Junior Member Regular Contributor
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    east norwalk, ct, usa
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    Re: Future of OpenGL (where does it belong to?)

    i'm curious about this too.

    will opengl remain microsoft-free?...
    is it microsoft-free now?

  3. #3
    Advanced Member Frequent Contributor
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    London
    Posts
    503

    Re: Future of OpenGL (where does it belong to?)

    OpenGL is controlled by the Architecture Review Board (ARB). Microsoft still has a seat on this board, but they don't really contribute a lot; as usual, they aren't particularly interested in supporting cross-platform solutions. The other board members include SGI, Sun, E&S, nVidia, ATI, 3Dlabs; the consumer-hardware ones have all joined in the last year or so.

    OpenGL definitely does not belong to MS, nor will MS ever take it over. OpenGL is an abstraction of the low-level rendering process; it steers well clear of OS-specific issues, so it would be very hard to break it with the usual embrace-extend-and-make-incompatible approach.

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