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View Full Version : ATI GL FIRE 8800 - graphics card owners!!



sandrew
04-23-2002, 06:56 AM
Hi all!
If you're the owner of ATI GL FIRE 8800 (128MB) and also had a chance to run your work (demo/game) on some other G-Forece 3 or 4 (eg. ASUS GF3)cards then please let me know if there is a big difference in performance between GL FIRE and other G-Force 3/4. The reason why I ask is because I just couldn't find much about that card on the net.
I am sorry that I posted this question to this forum but I know that this is the place where I will find people using this card as you take graphics seriously so you might have one already and have more clue about this stuff.
Currently I have ASUS G-Force3 64MB DDR so do you think its worth changing to ATI GL FIRE 8800 (128MB DDR - but not G-Force) for general use (games) as well as for Game development (OpenGL/DIrectX)?,
I dont mind about the price. Just imagine they're same price! Which one is better from you experience and you would go for? Thank you!


[This message has been edited by sandrew (edited 04-23-2002).]

Elixer
04-23-2002, 09:05 AM
Do you need a "high end" card? It sure doesn't seem like it, it is NOT a game card at all really, most people purchase the firegl card for doing stuff in 3dsmax.

There *are* reviews of the firegl 8800, try using google.

Oh yeah, and compare apples to apples, not apples to pears! http://www.opengl.org/discussion_boards/ubb/smile.gif

sandrew
04-23-2002, 09:28 AM
Ok Thx! I've tried Google - not much there!!

Ok but do you think that ATI GL FIRE 8800 would be a better card for game development than ASUS G-Force3?

What graphics cards do real game developers use for developing their games?

Sorry that I keep asking but my friend has this card (GL FIRE) and wants to sell it for £200. So I want to make sure if that card is better than my Asus GForce3.
Thank you!!


[This message has been edited by sandrew (edited 04-23-2002).]

jwatte
04-23-2002, 09:40 AM
You should use your target cards for developing your game. Anything else means you'll be surprised when you actually do a real test. While there's compatibility testing in QA, you'd be surprised at the things you'll miss unless you have your nose in the actual target hardware every day.

I have a GeForce2Go and a Radeon 8500, because those two cards nicely bracket our current target machines. They're also in a P-III machine and an Athlon, so I cover most of the CPU difference bases. Running 2000 and XP, respectively (but, gawds, we still have to test on 98 every so often).

Our artists, on the other hand, might benefit from something like a FireGL, or Wildcat, or something like that, because they work in 3dxmax, Lightwave, etc.

Developing for games on a CAD card is probably not a great idea, because some of the popular games features (like texture compression) might not even be available.

Humus
04-23-2002, 11:57 AM
Well, a Radeon 8800 is basically a higher clocked Radeon 8500 with more memory and drivers certified for a variety of highend apps. It'll suit you well for both game developement and professional apps. But you should of course test your app with other cards too before you release it if it's going to be anything commerical.

Coconut
04-23-2002, 12:04 PM
Originally posted by Humus:
Well, a Radeon 8800 is basically a higher clocked Radeon 8500 with more memory and drivers certified for a variety of highend apps. It'll suit you well for both game developement and professional apps.

I am not familiar with GL Fire 8800. But if what you said is correct, one must be an idiot to buy a GL Fire 8800 instead of a Radeon

sandrew
04-23-2002, 02:04 PM
These are the features:


Optimized for superior OpenGL® performance
OpenGL® double buffer overlay support
Support and compliance with DirectX® 8.1
SMARTSHADER™
TRUFORM™
SMOOTHVISION™ anti-aliasing
HYPER Z™ II
CHARISMA ENGINE™ II
PIXEL TAPESTRY™ II
High-performance memory support
Dual display support
Integrated Transformation, Clipping and Lighting (T&L)
Twin-cache architecture
SuperScalar rendering
Single-pass multi-texturing
True color rendering
Triangle setup engine
Texture cache
Bilinear/Trilinear filtering
Line & edge anti-aliasing
Full-screen anti-aliasing
Texture compositing
Texture decompression
Specular highlights
Perspectively correct texture mapping
Mip-mapping
Z-buffering and double-buffering

or even more here : http://www.ati.com/products/workstation/firegl8800/specs.html
what do u think???

[This message has been edited by sandrew (edited 04-23-2002).]

Humus
04-23-2002, 02:19 PM
Originally posted by Coconut:
I am not familiar with GL Fire 8800. But if what you said is correct, one must be an idiot to buy a GL Fire 8800 instead of a Radeon



Depends on your needs of course. I wouldn't recommend a normal gamer or hobbyist coder to buy it, but for professional developers I don't see what's so stupid about buying it. The benefit of the additional performance and solid drivers certified for professional apps may not be worth the additional dollars for the average joe, but for a company with professional developers or artists working with apps like maya and the like I would certainly recommend getting the 8800 instead of a 8500 as the additional cost is negiable compared to the cost of the engineer or artist that's going to use it.

Grimba
04-23-2002, 02:35 PM
I agree with Humus it all depends on what you are going to do with the card. The fireGL with it's drives is not made for games.

Here are some interesting things I've seen on an 8800 card.

About 20% slower than a 8500 clk for clk at Quake 3 with it's special drivers. With normal 8500 drivers you get the same speed as an 8500 clk for clk.

I've seen increases over 400% compaired to standard 8500 drivrers in rendering some scenes in 3d studio max.

sandrew
04-23-2002, 04:06 PM
Ok so you're saying that this card will not be a very good solution for game development. I am not going to use it for 3D max or Maya. I just want to use it for game development in OGL and DirectX.